standard Quebec City, Canada – Landmarks And Information

Quebec City is the oldest European settlements in North America. Quebec were created earlier than Quebec City. Quebec was founded by Samuel de Champlain, a French explorer and diplomat on July 3, 1608, and at the site of a long abandoned St. Lawrence Iroquoian settlement called Stadacona. Throughout its over four hundred years of existence, Quebec City has served as a capital. Quebec City is located in the Saint Lawrence River valley, on the north bank of the Saint Lawrence River near its meeting with the St. Charles River. The river valley has rich, arable soil, which makes this region the most fertile in the province. The Laurentian Mountains lie to the north of the city.

Quebec City Panorama

Panorama Of Quebec City's Skyline

Population

According to the 2006 census, there were 491,142 people residing in Quebec City proper, and 715,515 people in the city’s census metropolitan area. Of the former total, 48.2% were male and 51.8% were female. Children under five accounted for approximately 4.7% of the resident population of Quebec City.

Attractions

In Quebec City are a lot of attraction that you can’t missed. Among them are:

Parliament Buildigs. The Parliament Building is an imposing structure comprising four wings that form a square of about 100 metres (330′) per side. With the central tower, the building stands at 52 metres or 171 feet in height. The Québec national flag, referred to as “fleurdelisé”, has been flying from the central tower since 1948. From June 24 to September 6, 2009, the National Assembly offers visitors a number of activities to enable them to discover or rediscover the Québec Parliament Building as well as the history and mission of our parliamentary institutions.

Quebec City Parliament Buildings

Quebec City Parliament Buildings

Citadelle de Québec. The Citadelle is part of the Fortifications of Quebec and occupying the highest point of Cap Diamant, 100m above the St Lawrence River. The Citadelle is the home station of the Royal 22e Régiment “Van-Doos”, the prestigious French-speaking regiment of Canadian Forces. In addition to its use as a military installation, it is also an official residence of the Governor General of Canada.

Quebec City Citadelle

Quebec City Citadelle

Montmorency Falls Park. The falls are 83 metres high, 27 metres higher than Niagara Falls. A cable car takes visitors to the top for a hike to viewing belvederes and the suspension bridge over the cascade at the top of the ridge. This park offers a multitude of activities for the entire family. In the summer, walk across one of two suspension bridges or through miles of parkland trails. Ice climbing course on the frozen waterfall wall of ice and snow in the winter.

Basilique-Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Québec. In 1633, on part of the actual site, a humble votive chapel dedicated to the Virgin was built by Samuel de Champlain. It was rebuilt three times after fire and destruction, always on the same site. Rebuilt, in 1647, as Notre-Dame-de-la-Paix, after the fire of 1640, it became North America’s first parish church and was solemnly consecrated by Mgr de Laval in 1666.

The Artillery Park. Located near St. John Gate, in the very heart of Old Québec, this site bears witness to over 250 years of history. Today, you can discover one by one its unique buildings and other installations that reflect the military and industrial history of Québec.

Climate

Quebec City lies at the confluence of several climatic regions. Usually, the climate is classified as humid continental or hemiboreal (Köppen climate classification Dfb).
Quebec City experience four distict seasons. Summers are warm, with periods of hotter and humid weather with average high temperatures of 22 – 25°C (72 – 77°F) and lows of 17 – 19°C (61 – 67°F). Winters are often very cold, windy and snowy with average high temperatures -5 to -8°C (18 – 23°F) and lows -13 to -18°C (0 – 8°F). Spring and Fall, although short, brings chilly to warm temperatures. Late heat waves as well as “Indian summers” are a common occurrence.

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